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Microsoft - MS-200: Planning and Configuring a Messaging Platform

Sample Questions

Question: 149
Measured Skill: Manage mail flow topology (35-40%)

You have a Microsoft Exchange Server 2019 organization that uses an authoritative domain named contoso.com.

Your company has a third-party email system that uses a namespace of fabrikam.com.

You plan to allow some users in the Exchange organization to receive email by using the SMTP domain of fabrikam.com.

You need to ensure that the Exchange organization can receive email for the fabrikam.com namespace. The organization must be able to route email to the third-party email system for unresolved recipients. The solution must support the email address policies of fabrikam.com.

What should you configure?

AA remote domain
B An internal relay accepted domain
C An authoritative accepted domain
D An external relay accepted domain

Correct answer: B

Explanation:

Accepted domains are the SMTP name spaces (also known as address spaces) that you configure in an Exchange organization to receive email messages. For example, if your company registered the domain contoso.com, and you configured a mail exchanger (MX) record in your Internet DNS for contoso.com, you need to configure contoso.com as an accepted domain in your Exchange organization to accept messages that are addressed to @contoso.com recipients.

Accepted domains in Exchange 2016 and Exchange 2019 are basically unchanged from Exchange Server 2010, and consist of the following types:

  • Authoritative domains: Recipients (in particular, mailboxes) are configured with email addresses in these domains. The Exchange organization accepts messages that are addressed to recipients in these domains, and is responsible for generating non-delivery reports (also known as NDRs or bounce messages) for non-existent recipients.

  • Relay domains: The Exchange organization accepts messages that are addressed to recipients in relay domains, but isn't responsible for generating NDRs for non-existent recipients. Instead, Exchange (with additional configuration) relays the messages to messaging servers that are external to the Exchange organization. Relay domains can be internal (for domains that you control) or external (for domains that you don't control).

An accepted domain can be a single domain (contoso.com) or a domain with subdomains (*.contoso.com). Accepted domains are a global setting for the Exchange organization, and you can have multiple accepted domains of the same or different types.

You configure an accepted domain as a relay domain (also known as non-authoritative domain) when some or none of the recipients in that domain exist in your Exchange organization (for example, partners or subsidiaries).

Reference: Accepted domains in Exchange Server



Question: 150
Measured Skill: Manage mail flow topology (35-40%)

You have a Microsoft Exchange Server 2019 organization that uses a namespace of contoso.com. The organization contains two Mailbox servers.

You need to configure the Exchange organization to receive TLS-authenticated email from fabrikam.com Mail servers.

Which type of connector should you create?

AA Hub Transport Receive connector that listens on TCP port 25.
B A Frontend Transport Receive connector that listens on TCP port 587.
C A Hub Transport Receive connector that listens on TCP port 587.
D A Frontend Transport Receive connector that listens on TCP port 25.

Correct answer: D

Explanation:

Exchange servers use Receive connectors to control inbound SMTP connections from:

  • Messaging servers that are external to the Exchange organization.

  • Services in the transport pipeline on the local Exchange server or on remote Exchange servers.

  • Email clients that need to use authenticated SMTP to send messages.

You can create Receive connectors in the Transport service on Mailbox servers, the Front End Transport service on Mailbox servers, and on Edge Transport servers. By default, the Receive connectors that are required for inbound mail flow are created automatically when you install an Exchange Mailbox server, and when you subscribe an Edge Transport server to your Exchange organization.

A Receive connector is associated with the Mailbox server or Edge Transport server where it's created, and determines how that specific server listens for SMTP connections. On Mailbox servers, the Receive connector is stored in Active Directory as a child object of the server. On Edge Transport servers, the Receive connector is stored in Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS).

These are the important settings on Receive connectors:

  • Local adapter bindings: Configure the combination of local IP addresses and TCP ports that the Receive connector uses to accept connections.

  • Remote network settings: Configure the source IP addresses that the Receive connector listens to for connections.

  • Usage type: Configure the default permission groups and smart host authentication mechanisms for the Receive connector.

  • Permission groups: Configure who's allowed to use the Receive connector, and the permissions that they receive.

A Receive connector listens for inbound connections that match the configuration settings of the connector. Each Receive connector on the Exchange server uses a unique combination of local IP address bindings, TCP ports, and remote IP address ranges that define if and how connections from SMTP clients or servers are accepted.

Port 25 is used for server connections. Port 587 is used for client connections that needs to be authenticated.

Reference: Receive connectors



Question: 151
Measured Skill: Manage mail flow topology (35-40%)

You have a Microsoft Exchange Server 2019 organization.

A user reports that several email messages were not received. You suspect that the messages were filtered by the Exchange servers.

You need to review the filter that removed the messages.

Which cmdlet should you run?

ANew-AdminAuditLogSearch
B Export-MailboxDiagnosticLogs
C Search-UnifiedAuditLog
D Get-AntiSpamFilteringReport.ps1

Correct answer: D

Explanation:

In the first step we have to determine which filter prevented the delivery of the email messages.

You can use the Get-AgentLog cmdlet and the Get-AntiSpamFilteringReport.ps1 script to search the anti-spam agent logs.

The Get-AntiSpamFilteringReport.ps1 script is located in %ExchangeInstallPath%\Scripts. You need to run the script in the Shell from the Scripts folder.

For details about using the script, run the following command:

Get-Help -Detailed .\Get-AntiSpamFilteringReport.ps1

Reference: Search the agent logs

Question: 152
Measured Skill: Manage recipients and devices (15-20%)

You have a Microsoft Exchange Server 2019 organization that contains four Mailbox servers and one Edge Transport server.

Several hundred remote users connect to the organization by using Microsoft Outlook on the web.

You plan to migrate to a third-party message hygiene solution for all inbound email messages.

You need to prevent the users from managing their junk email settings by using Outlook on the web.

What should you do?

AModify the default Outlook Web App policy.
B Remove the default Outlook Web App policy.
C Run the Set-ContentFilterConfig -Enabled $false command.
D Run the Set-MailboxJunkEmailConfiguration -Enabled $false command.

Correct answer: D

Explanation:

The Set-MailboxJunkEmailConfiguration cmdlet controls the following junk email settings on the mailbox:
  • Enable or disable the junk email rule: The junk email rule (a hidden Inbox rule named Junk E-mail Rule) controls the delivery of messages to the Junk Email folder or the Inbox based on the SCL Junk Email Folder threshold (for the organization or the mailbox) and the safelist collection on the mailbox. Users can enable or disable the junk email rule in their own mailbox by using Outlook on the web.

  • Configure the safelist collection: The safelist collection is the Safe Senders list, the Safe Recipients list, and the Blocked Senders list. Users can configure the safelist collection on their own mailbox by using Microsoft Outlook or Outlook on the web.

This example disables the junk email rule configuration for the user named David Pelton.

Set-MailboxJunkEmailConfiguration "David Pelton" -Enabled $false

Reference: Set-MailboxJunkEmailConfiguration

Question: 153
Measured Skill: Manage recipients and devices (15-20%)

You have a Microsoft Exchange Server 2019 organization. The organization contains a user named User1. Multiple users have full access to the mailbox of User1.

Some email messages appear to have been read and deleted before User1 viewed them.

You need to track the identity of any user who deletes the email messages of User1 in the future.

Which command should you run?

ASet-Mailbox -Identity "User1" -AuditEnabled $true
B Set-MailboxFolderPermission -Identity "User1" -User User1@contoso.com -AccessRights Owner
C Set-AdminAuditLogConfig -AdminAuditLogEnabled $true -AdminAuditLogCmdlets "Mailbox"
D Set-Mailbox "User1" -AuditEnabled $true -AuditOwner MailboxLogin

Correct answer: A

Explanation:

Starting in January 2019, Microsoft is turning on mailbox audit logging by default for all organizations. This means that certain actions performed by mailbox owners, delegates, and admins are automatically logged, and the corresponding mailbox audit records will be available when you search for them in the mailbox audit log. Before mailbox auditing was turned on by default, you had to manually enable it for every user mailbox in your organization.

To check wether auditing is enabled for a specific mailbox use:

Get-Mailbox -Identity User1 | Format-List AuditEnabled

To enable auditing for a specific malbox use:

Set-Mailbox -Identity User1 -AuditEnabled $true

Reference: Manage mailbox auditing



 
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